Atari History Timelines by Michael Current

A History of
AT Games / Atari Games / Midway Games West

http://mcurrent.name/atarihistory/at_games.html
Compiled and Copyright (c) 2008-2017 by Michael D. Current
Library Department, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse


TO DO: All licensed ports of Atari Games games

Additions/suggestions/comments/corrections to:
michael@mcurrent.name

Information presented here is derived as directly as possible from sources published or produced in the original time period.  While also consulted extensively, modern historical retrospectives (including books, oral histories, and especially websites) are utilized chiefly as pathways to primary sources.

Jump to: 1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 | 1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | Links


1985
January 10: Articles of Incorporation of AT Games Inc. executed by Namco Ltd. (of Japan) USA subsidiary Namco-America, Inc.  1,000,000 shares of one class of stock were authorized to be issued.  Incorporator: Victoria C. Phelps

Namco logo     Namco-America, Inc.     AT Games Inc.

February 4: Namco Ltd. (of Japan) announced that, through USA subsidiary Namco-America, Inc., it had purchased the tangible assets and the intangible property rights (patents, trademarks, and copyrights) associated with the Atari Coin-Operated Games ("Atari Games") division of Atari Games, Inc. from Warner Communications Inc. (WCI) for a little over US$10 million.  (Upon the sale, the Atari Games, Inc. subsidiary of WCI would adopt the new name, Atari Holdings, Inc.)  The acquisition was made by the Namco-America subsidiary, AT Games Inc.

The sale included the right to use the "Atari Games" trademark on coin-operated arcade games.  (The rights to the "Atari" trademark outside of coin-operated arcade environments had already been purchased by Atari, Corp. effective June 30, 1984.)

The sale included the derivative coin-operated arcade market rights to legacy Atari coin-operated arcade game properties created before June 30, 1984.  (The underlying rights to those properties had already been purchased by Atari, Corp. effective June 30, 1984.)

The sale also included the full rights (both coin-op and consumer markets) to legacy Atari Games, Inc. games properties created since June 30, 1984.  This included: Return of the Jedi and Marble Madness

While Namco-America would own controlling interest in AT Games (about 60%), WCI would retain significant minority ownership (about 40%) as well.

AT Games retained most "Atari Games" division staff (about 210).

AT Games ("Atari Games") main location (offices and engineering): 1272 Borregas Ave, Sunnyvale, CA, USA (94,000 square feet); manufacturing/customer service: 735/737 Sycamore Dr, Milpitas CA (46,000 square feet)

Hideyuki Nakajima ("Hide", pronounced HEE-day), president of Namco-America, Inc. (which he headed since its inception on June 8, 1978; before that he had been Namco, Ltd. EVP for Atari Japan Corp.), would now additionally be president of AT Games.  Dennis Wood, vice president and general counsel for Namco-America since 1/1/1982, would now additionally serve in the same capacity for AT Games.  Continuing with the company: Dave Stubben as SVP engineering; Lyle V. Rains as VP creative development; Dan Van Elderen as VP engineering; Kevin Hayes as VP Operations; Jerry Marcus as EVP sales, Bob Harvey as director of sales, Shane Breaks as VP of international marketing and sales.  Namco president Masaya Nakamura appointed himself chairman of AT Games.

February 15: In Ireland, Namco had acquired the Pedherton Investments Limited ownership share (controlling majority) in the Atari Games coin-op manufacturing facility in Tipperary town Ireland.  (The AIL Ireland Limited subsidiary of Warner Communications held a minority ownership share in the facility.)  Pedherton Investments passed a resolution to change the name of the company to: Newco Ireland Limited.  The location employed about 70 employees, and Mike Nevin remained managing director.

February 19: Certificate of amendment of Articles of Incorporation of AT Games executed by AT Games president and secretary Hideyuki Nakajima, changing the name of the company from AT Games Inc. to Atari Games Corporation.  The total number of outstanding shares of Atari Games was 910,000.

Namco logo       Namco-America, Inc.       Atari Games logo 1985-1996

March 1-3: Amusement Showcase International (ASI) at Expocenter/Chicago.  Atari Games planned to attend.

March 5: In Ireland, the name of Pedherton Investments Limited was changed to: Newco Ireland Limited.

March: Atari Games released The Empire Strikes Back (conversion kit for Star Wars upright or cockpit units).

March: Atari Games SVP Engineering Dave Stubben departed the company.  Lyle Rains (previously vp creative development) and Dan Van Elderen (previously VP engineering) would both be promoted to the title of SVP engineering.

March: Shane Breaks became Atari Games SVP sales (previously: Atari Games VP international marketing and sales), replacing former EVP sales Jerry Marcus and former director of sales Bob Harvey who both departed the company.

March 27: Atari Games announced 30 layoffs, as well as 5% to 20% pay cuts for management.  The company now employed about 180 people.  (UPI)

April: Atari Games released Paperboy (System II hardware platform).

May 1: In Ireland, Newco Ireland Limited passed a resolution to change the name of the company to: Atari Games Ireland Limited. 

May 17: In Ireland, the name of Newco Ireland Limited was changed to: Atari Games Ireland Limited. 

June?: Atari Games offices and engineering were moved to new facilities (83,000 square feet) at 675 Sycamore Drive, Milpitas, CA, USA (previously: 1272 Borregas Ave, Sunnyvale, CA, USA).  Next door, manufacturing/customer service remained at 735/737 Sycamore Dr. (46,000 square feet)

Month?: John H. Klein, previously of Family Vision Centers, joined Atari Games as CFO.

Month?: Atari Games programmer/designer Mark Cerny departed the company. (to Sega)

July: Atari Games released Peter Pack Rat (System I hardware platform, or conversion kit for System I units), and released Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (System I hardware platform, or conversion kit for System I units).

September: Sega contracted with Atari Games Ireland for local assembly and distribution of Sega games, starting with Hang-On.

October: Atari Games released Gauntlet (original 4-player version).

November 27: Atari Games director of visual communications (Graphics Group / art department) George H. Opperman passed away. (ArtOfAtari p.34)

1986
January: First issue of Atari Games Players Club (replacement for Coin Connection)

February: Mark Pierce joined Atari Games as a designer.

March 7-9: At the American Coin Machine Exhibition (ACME) in Chicago, Atari Games introduced Super Sprint (and on behalf of Namco introduced Robo Soccer), and also featured: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Gauntlet (APGCapr86)

April: Atari Games released Super Sprint (System II hardware platform).

April: Pat McCarthy was Atari Games senior electrical engineer; Lyle Rains and Dan Van Elderen were both SVP engineering.  (APGCapr86)

May: Atari Games released Gauntlet (2-player version).

July: Atari Games released Road Runner (System I hardware platform, or conversion kit for System I units).

August: Atari Games released Gauntlet II (new unit, conversion kit for Gauntlet 4-player, or conversion kit for Gauntlet 2-player).

September: Atari Games released Championship Sprint (System II hardware platform, or conversion kit for System II units).

October 30: Mike Taylor, previously of Ryan-McFarland, joined Atari Games as Vice President of Sales.  Shane Breaks, previously SVP sales, moved (back) to England to serve as head of European sales (for both Atari Games and Namco; in conjunction with David Smith).

November 6-8: At the Amusement & Music Operators Association AMOA Expo '86 in Chicago, Atari Games introduced 720°. (APGCdec86)

December: Atari Games released 720° (System II hardware platform).

December 22-23: Certificate of amendment of articles of incorporation of Atari Games Corporation executed by Atari Games president Hideyuki Nakajima and secretary Dennis Wood, regarding a 1-for-10 split of company stock.  The total number of common shares now authorized to be issued: 10,000,000

1987
Winter?: A group of Atari Games employees, headed by Atari Games president Hide Nakajima, purchased about 1/3 of Namco-America's 60% controlling share of Atari Games from Namco, or about 20% of the total outstanding shares of Atari Games.

As a result, Atari Games was now about 20% owned by Nakajima and his associates, about 40% owned by Namco-America, and about 40% still owned by Warner Communications.  Thus Atari Games became independent of any controlling share owner.

Atari Games logo 1985-1996

Hide Nakajima then resigned from his position on the Namco board of directors, and from his position as president of Namco-America.  Nakajima would now devote his full attention to the management of Atari Games.

February: Atari Games released Rolling Thunder by Namco.

March: Atari Games released RoadBlasters (System I hardware platform, conversion kit for System I units, or Sit-Down version)

May: Atari Games released Dunk Shot by Sega.

June 3-5: At their annual distributor meeting, held at Hilton Head SC, Atari Games introduced APB. (source)

June 8: Mindscape announced that on May 29, 1987, it signed an exclusive agreement with Atari Games to publish home computer versions of their line of video arcade games.  The First of the Atari Games titles to be published by Mindscape would be Paperboy and Gauntlet.  Planned later titles would include: Road Runner, Road Blasters, Gauntlet II, 720°

July: Atari Games released APB (All Points Bulletin; System II hardware platform), and released Dragon Spirit by Namco.

July 29: On behalf of Atari Games, the law firm of Irell & Manella established the new Atari Games subsidiary, Atari Operations, Inc., for the purpose of acquiring the assets of Barrel of Fun, Inc.  Kristi Dykstra was the incorporator.  John H. Klein was Atari Games assistant secretary.

Atari Games logo 1985-1996          Atari Operations, Inc.

July 30: Effective date that Atari Games Corporation and Barrel of Fun, Inc. of Savannah, Georgia finalized an agreement for the sale of Barrel of Fun's entire chain of arcades to a new subsidiary of Atari Games.  Barrel of Fun was founded 12/9/1977 by Herbert C. Skinner, chairman, and Richard W. Adams, President and CEO.

August: Peter L. Takaichi remained Atari Games design services director (industrial design). (source)

September 1: Through its newly-established Atari Operations subsidiary, Atari Games purchased all assets of Barrel of Fun, Inc., owner/operator of the "Barrel of Fun" and "2001 Entertainment Center" chains of video game arcades, located primarily in six southeastern U.S. states.

Atari Games logo 1985-1996          Barrel Of Fun token scan 2001 Entertainment Center token scan
Atari Operations

Richard Adams (Dick Adams), formerly President of Barrel of Fun, joined Atari Games as VP Atari Operations.

September: Atari Games released Atari R.B.I. Baseball by Namco (conversion kit for Nintendo VS. System units).

November: Atari Games released Xybots.

December: Atari Games released Pac-Mania by Namco.

December 21: Atari Games established the wholly-owned subsidiary, Tengen Inc., for the purpose of marketing games for home video game systems (where exclusive use of the "Atari" name and "Fuji" logo was owned by Atari Corporation).  Dennis Wood was the incorporator, as well as the originator of the idea.  Atari Games president Hide Nakajima had come up with the name, Tengen.

Atari Games logo 1985-1996          Barrel Of Fun token scan 2001 Entertainment Center token scan          Tengen logo
Atari Operations

Randall Broweleit (Randy Broweleit), previously of Strategic Simulations, Inc., joined Atari Games to head Tengen as Senior Vice President of Operations.  Tengen would be headquartered at: 1901 McCarthy Blvd, Milpitas CA.  Atari Games headquarters would remain at 675 Sycamore Drive, Milpitas CA.

1988
January 1:
Kevin Hayes, previously Atari Games VP of Operations, became Executive Vice President of Atari Operations Inc. (AOI), the top management position for the subsidiary.  Reporting to Kevin at Atari Operations would be Richard Adams (previously vp of Atari Operations), Vice President AOI for the U.S. Southern Region, and Satish Bhutani, Vice President AOI for the U.S. Western Region.

January 18: Tengen formally became a Nintendo licensee, clearing the way for Tengen to produce Nintendo-approved games for the NES.

January 28: A Virginia law firm filed an affidavit in the U.S. Copyright Office on behalf of Atari Games, indicating that a copy of Nintendo's 10NES computer code, the software part of the NES lock-out security system that enforced Nintendo's policy that only Nintendo could produce cartridges for the NES, was required for pending proceedings under way in U.S. District Court in the Northern District of California.  While no such suit had been filed against Atari Games, the 10NES source code was nevertheless delivered to Atari Games.

Winter? Steve Calfee (veteran of Atari, Inc. from 1976-1984) joined Tengen as Vice-President of Product Development.

February: Atari Games released Blasteroids.

Spring: Mike Taylor, previously Atari Games sales vp, became sales manager for Tengen.  Satish Bhutani, previously vp Atari Operations for the U.S. Western Region, became the new Atari Games vp of sales.  David Bishop would be promoted to Atari Operations VP U.S. Western Region, replacing Bhutani in the role.

April: Atari Games released Galaga '88 by Namco (new unit, or JAMMA conversion kit), and released Vindicators.

May 9: Report that Atari Games employed 195 people.

May 10: Atari Games had purchased 15.6 acres of land in North San Jose where it planned to build a new headquarters. Atari Games expected the facility to house 400 workers when complete in 1990. (NewsBytes)   (Future Tengen headquarters: 1623 Buckeye Drive, Milpitas CA)

May: Atari Games acquired worldwide exclusive rights to the emerging cult hit Soviet video game, Tetris, from Mirrorsoft.  (Most of Mirrorsoft's legal authority to sublicense rights to Tetris would not hold up in court.  Atari Games would ultimately be left with only the coin-operated arcade rights to Tetris.)

May: Atari Games released Pot Shot (redemption / non-video), and released Final Lap (original Sit-Down version) by Namco.

June: At the Summer CES in Chicago, Tengen introduced their first titles: (Nintendo-authorized) Pac-Man, Gauntlet, and R.B.I. Baseball for the NES.

June: Atari Operations launched the Atari Expo family amusement center name/concept. (USPTO TESS--1st use of service mark)

Atari Games logo 1985-1996          Barrel Of Fun token scan 2001 Entertainment Center token scan Atari Expo token v.1          Tengen logo
Atari Operations

June: Atari Games released Toobin'.

Months?: Domark released Return of the Jedi, title by Atari Games, for Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, BBC Micro, Commodore 64, DOS, ZX Spectrum. (U.K.)

Month?: David Akers joined Atari Games where he would be a software engineer.

July 3: Atari/Ragtimes Enterprises, a joint-venture between Atari Operations and Orlando Businessman Bob Snow, opened the Commander Ragtime's video game parlor and bar (Commander Ragtime's Midway of Fun, Food & Games) in 21,000 square feet on the third floor of the Church Street Exchange shopping emporium in downtown Orlando FL.  Kevin Hayes was executive vice president of Atari Operations, which operated entertainment centers, primarily in the Southeastern U.S., under the names 2001 and Barrel of Fun.

July 28: Certificate of amendment of Articles of Incorporation of Atari Games Corporation executed by president Hideyuki Nakajima and secretary Dennis Wood regarding, in part, increasing the total number of company shares authorized to issue by 500,000, to 10,500,000.  The total number of outstanding shares of the company was 9,480,100.

August: Atari Games released Assault by Namco.

September: Atari Games released Cyberball (2 screens, 4 players).

October: Atari Games released Final Lap (Up-Right version) by Namco.

October 21: Atari Games announced the new subsidiary, Tengen Japan, located in Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, and headed by Kazuo Matsunaga, President, who was most recently responsible for the engineering R&D efforts at Namco Limited.

October 25: Atari Games announced the departure of Satish Bhutani, Vice President of Sales, effective at the end of October.  Shane Breaks, Vice President of International Sales, would fill the vacant position on a temporary basis.  David Smith would fill in for Breaks in European sales.

December 12: Tengen introduced the first independently produced and manufactured Nintendo-compatible video game cartridges: new releases of the Tengen's Pac-Man (title by Namco), Gauntlet, and R.B.I. Baseball. All future Tengen releases for the NES would also ship without authorization by Nintendo.  Tengen NES cartridge industrial design: Peter L. Takaichi

December 12: Atari Games filed a suit for US$100 million against Nintendo of America Inc. and its Japanese parent, Nintendo Co. Ltd., charging that Nintendo had monopolized the U.S. market for video game cartridges that will play on Nintendo's home entertainment systems.

December 27: Barrel of Fun, Inc., was dissolved.

1989
January 5:
Nintendo announced a countersuit against Atari Games, filed in federal district court in San Francisco, for breach of contract, violation of trademark laws and unfair competition. They also charged conspiracy and RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations).  Nintendo also revoked its licensing agreement with Atari Games.

January 7: At the Winter Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Tengen introduced Super Sprint, Rolling Thunder (title by Namco) and Vindicators for NES, all expected to ship in May 1989, and also announced Tetris (title by Academysoft-Elorg) for the NES.

January: At the Amusement Trades Exhibition International (ATEI) show at Olympia in London, Atari Games introduced Tetris, introduced Splatterhouse by Namco, featured Cyberball, and introduced Hard Drivin'. (TheGamesMachine #16 3/89 p68)

February 2: Nintendo of America filed a patent-infringement suit against competitor Atari Games in U.S. District Court in San Francisco.  Nintendo accused Atari Games of patent violation by marketing unlicensed home video-game cartridges for play on the Nintendo Entertainment System.  The suit claimed Atari Games infringed on Nintendo's patented software-security chips (U.S. PATENT NO. 4,799,635) designed to allow only Nintendo-licensed games to play on Nintendo Entertainment System hardware.  The charge was an amended complaint to Nintendo's Jan. 5 lawsuit charging Atari Games and Tengen with trademark infringement, breach of contract and unfair competition.

February 3: Assignee Atari Games Corporation gained assignor's interest in 184 patents from assignor Atari Holdings, Inc.

February: Atari Games released Tetris Kit (original release, for JAMMA units), released Hard Drivin' (original Deluxe Cockpit version), released Splatterhouse by Namco (Printed Circuit Board for JAMMA units), and released Vindicators Part II (conversion kit for Gauntlet units)

February 15: Atari Games and Tengen amended and expanded their Dec. 12, 1988 anti-trust lawsuit against Nintendo of America and its Japanese parent, Nintendo Company Ltd. to include additional anti-trust claims and claims for patent infringement, tortious interference with business relations and trade libel.  The new legal complaints, filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, called for an immediate injunction against all future sales of Nintendo products, as well as an injunction against Nintendo's wrongful interference in the business operations of Atari Games and Tengen. The complaint also sought $100 million in treble anti-trust damages, as well as unspecified and substantial patent and punitive damages. Awarded patent damages would be trebled according to federal statutes.  The Atari Games/Tengen lawsuit alleged that Nintendo utilized patented technology in the development of its Nintendo Entertainment System. The technology covered in U.S. Patent No. 4,445,114, "Apparatus for Scrolling a Video Display," (Patent 114) issued to David R. Stubben (of Atari, Inc.) on April 24, 1984, plays an integral role in the function of the NES.  Atari Games/Tengen also alleged in the suit that Nintendo had intentionally misled and deceived existing and potential customers by stating that the sale of Tengen products is a violation of the law and may nullify Nintendo warranties.

March 3: U.S. District Judge Fern Smith in San Francisco granted Atari Games and Nintendo preliminary injunctions against each other, prohibiting Nintendo from filing patent infringement suits against retailers that carry Atari Games' Tengen software, and banning Atari Games from filing patent infringement suits against producers of Nintendo products.  The injunction would be in place until legal disputes between the two companies would be resolved.

March 4: Time Inc. and Warner Communications Inc. (WCI) announced plans to merge, where Time would acquire WCI to form Time Warner Inc.

March 30: Tengen selected Keye/Donna/Pearlstein, Los Angeles, as its first advertising agency. The account would bill $10 million annually.

April: Tengen revenues for its 1988 fiscal year (ending March 31) totaled about $39 million.

April 3: Dan Van Elderen, previosuly Atari Games SVP Engineering, became Tengen COO (head of the unit) and EVP for administration, finance and engineering.  Randall Broweleit became Tengen SVP sales and marketing (previously: Tengen SVP Operations since its inception).  Richard Moore was promoted to Atari Games VP Engineering.  (Lyle Rains remained Atari Games SVP engineering.)  Robert Sheffield was promoted to Atari Games VP Finance and CFO, replacing the departed John Klein, who would continue to serve as a consultant.

April 6: Nintendo announced it would offer the first ever video game developed in the Soviet Union and predicted that the game, called Tetris, would become one of its biggest sellers.  Tetris had already sold more than 100,000 copies for use on home computers in the US and won numerous industry awards.  Nintendo of America said the company had entered into a worldwide exclusive licensing agreement with Elektronorgtechnica (Elorg), the Soviet Foreign Trade Association, to market Tetris.

April 18: Atari Games/Tengen filed a lawsuit charging Nintendo of America and its Japanese parent with infringing Tengen's copyrights in its new home-video game, Tetris.  According to the lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, Tengen had the exclusive right to manufacture and distribute Tetris cartridges for use on Nintendo's video-game players, having acquired the rights to Tetris from Mirrorsoft in May 1988.

Spring: Atari Operations opened two new locations in San Jose CA: Atari Expo #22 at Eastridge Mall, managed by Jeff Trotto, and Atari Expo #23 in Westgate Mall, managed by Feff Pippin. (AtariLife Apr90 p6)  

May: Atari Corporation was joined as a co-plaintiff in the patent infringement action against Nintendo, now entitled Atari Games Corporation, Tengen Inc., and Atari Corp. v. Nintendo of America, Inc., et al. (Case No. C88-4805 FMS). In its complaint, Atari joined Atari Games in alleging that Nintendo had infringed upon U.S. Patent No. 4,445,114, "Apparatus for Scrolling a Video Display," issued to David R. Stubben (of Atari, Inc.) on April 24, 1984.

May 17: Tengen celebrated the release of Tetris for the NES by holding a lavish reception at the Russian Tea Room in New York, NY.

May 25: Nintendo of America filed a countersuit in federal court in San Francisco charging Atari and its subsidiary Tengen of infringing on the rights to the Soviet game, Tetris.  The court action sought to enforce Nintendo's rights and those of ELORG, a Soviet government agency that licensed Nintendo to distribute Tetris.  U.S. District Judge Vern Smith denied the motion by Nintendo for a preliminary injunction against Atari and Tengen regarding Tetris.  At the same time, the judge denied Tengen's motion to dismiss the suit.  A June 15 hearing regarding the Tetris matter was scheduled.

In another decision, Judge Smith rejected motions by Atari Games and Tengen to dismiss Nintendo's claims of trademark infringement and patent infringement in earlier (Feb. 2) legal action.

June: At the Summer CES in Chicago, Tengen introduced several titles for home computer/gaming platforms (including the Atari ST), including: Blasteroids (licensed to Mirrorsoft), Vindicators, APB, Xybots

June: Atari Games released Hard Drivin' (Compact Upright version), and released Escape From the Planet of the Robot Monsters (new unit, or Universal Kit for JAMMA units)

June: New Tengen headquarters location: 1623 Buckeye Drive, Milpitas, Calif.

June 21: U.S. District Court Judge Fern Smith issued a preliminary injunction that barred Atari Games' Tengen Inc. subsidiary from marketing or distributing its version of Tetris for NES.  U.S. retailers who had ordered Tengen's Tetris would be asked to remove the product from their shelves.  Detailed that emerged from the ruling: Nintendo had negotiated directly with Elorg, a Soviet agency, to get a license to make a video-cartridge version of the game.  Tengen had received a license earlier from the British company Mirrorsoft, which had obtained a Soviet license for a computer-game version.  The trial regarding the Tetris matter would begin on November 13.

Month? Tengen released Rolling Thunder developed by U.S. Gold, title by Namco, for C-64/128 (USA distribution)

Month?: The Atari Games Ireland plant at Ardfinnan, County Tipperary, was closed and the 15 remaining staff there were transferred to the plant in Tipperary town, County Tipperary.  Total employment at Atari Games Ireland was 60 people. (The Irish Times 10/18/96 supp p4)

July 5: Atari Games announced their new division, Sho Graphics, and the division's ShoView external graphics coprocessor for PC and compatibles with SCSI interface. Rich Moore was Atari Games Vice President/Engineering.

July: Atari Operations established Atari Expo #25 in Cloverleaf Mall in Hattiesburg MS, managed by Wayne Flurry. (AtariLife Apr90 p6)

July 24: Pursuant to a tender offer, Time Inc. acquired a controlling majority of the outstanding stock of Warner Communications Inc. (59.3%), and the name of Time Inc. was changed to Time Warner Inc.

July 31-August 4: Atari Games' Sho Graphics division introduced ShoView at the SIGGRAPH '89 Conference in Boston.  ShoView was to ship with the HOOPS graphics software from Ithaca Software, and sell for under $12,000.  Jim Morris was Sho Graphics staff engineer. (source)

August: Atari Games released 2-Screen Tournament Cyberball 2072.

September: Atari Games released 1-Screen Cyberball 2072, and released S.T.U.N. Runner (Spread Tunnel Underground Network Runner).

October 11: Atari Operations opened Atari Expo #26, managed by Donavan Duckworth, as part of the grand opening of the Aiken Mall, Aiken SC. (one source: AtariLife Apr90 p6)

October?: Atari Operations opened Atari Expo #28 in Manchester Centre in Fresno CA. (AtariLife Apr90 p6)

October: Atari Games released 2-Screen Tournament Cyberball 2072 Conversion Kit for Cyberball units.

Fall: Tengen senior vp for sales and marketing Randy Broweleit departed the company.

November: Atari Games released 1-Screen Cyberball 2072 Universal Kit (for JAMMA units), and released Skull & Crossbones (new unit, or Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

November 13: U.S. District Court in San Francisco, Judge Fern M. Smith, cancelled the Tetris trial, instead announcing a summary judgment in Nintendo's favor.  Nintendo was ruled to have exclusive rights to the game of Tetris on the NES, as secured from ELORG.  Tengen's license to Tetris on the NES via Mirrorsoft was ruled to be invalid, and hence Tengen had no right to manufacture or market its version of the game.  The courts ordered all the Tengen Tetris games destroyed.  Atari Games said it intended to appeal the ruling. (It did not.)

November 29: U.S. District Court Judge Fern Smith of San Francisco allowed Nintendo of America to file additional copyright and patent infringement claims against Atari Games and Tengen.  Nintendo's amended complaint alleged that Atari Games fraudulently and unlawfully obtained the copyrighted NES security program from the U.S. Copyright Office and used it in the manufacture of cartridges compatible for play on the NES.  Nintendo's amended complaint alleged that after Atari Games failed in an effort to lawfully reverse engineer the NES security software, the company obtained a copy of Nintendo's security system computer program from the U.S. Copyright Office by falsely representing that it was engaged in copyright litigation with Nintendo involving the program.  Nintendo's amended complaint also charged Atari Games with willful infringement of a second security system patent recently issued by the U.S. Patent Office (U.S. PATENT NO. 4,865,321).  Nintendo said it would seek injunctive relief preventing Atari Games, or anyone acting in concert with it, from manufacturing or selling cartridges for play on the NES that contained microprocessors which infringed Nintendo's copyrighted computer program.

December: Atari Games released Four Trax (original moving version) by Namco.

1990
January 6-9: Adjacent to the Winter CES in Las Vegas, Atari Corporation announced an agreement with Atari Games Corporation that would bring up to 35 Atari Games arcade titles to the Lynx from Atari Corporation.

January 8-11: At the Amusement Trades Exhibition International (ATEI) show at Olympia in London, Atari Games introduced Badlands, introduced KLAX, and introduced Four Trax by Namco. (AtariLife Apr90 p3)

January 10: Warner Communications Inc. (WCI) became a wholly owned subsidiary of Time Warner Inc.  Use of the Warner Communications brand would be discontinued.

January: Atari Games released Badlands (new unit, or Universal Kit for JAMMA units), and released 2-Screen Tournament Cyberball 2072 VS. Kit (for Nintendo VS. DualSystem upright cabinets).

February: Atari Games released KLAX (standard upright version, Cabaret version, or Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

March 7: In (897 F.2d 1572) The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington D.C. vacated the March 3, 1989 preliminary injunction previously granted against both Atari Games/Tengen and Nintendo by the U.S. District Court in Northern California which enjoined lawsuits against third-parties who dealt in products which may infringe the rights of the patent holder.  As a result, Atari Games was free to sue retailers who sold infringing Nintendo product, and Nintendo was free to sue retailers who sold unauthorized NES Cartridges.

March: Over the previous 12 months, Atari Operations, Inc. had opened 9 new arcades for a total of 34 operating locations.  2 more new locations were expected to open by the end of the month, for a total of 36 locations. (AtariLife Apr90 p6)

March: Namco Ltd. (of Japan), via Namco-America, Inc., took over the Funtasia games arcade at San Francisco's PIER 39.  The arcade would be among the first, if not the first, to adopt the Namco CyberStation Amusement Zone concept. The location featured bumper cars and more than 100 games.  (source)

April: Atari Games released Four Trax (stationary version) by Namco.

May 3: "Possible Violations of U.S. Antitrust Laws by Foreign Corporations" hearing before the Subcommittee on Economic and Commercial Law of the Committee on the Judiciary, U.S. House of Representatives, included testimony by Tengen EVP and COO Daniel N. Van Elderen.

May 7: Atari Corporation announced Gauntlet: The Third Encounter for the Atari Lynx (developed by Epyx; title by Atari Games via Tengen) 

May 22: Shographics, Inc. was established as a spin-off of the former Atari Games division, Sho Graphics.

May 23: Tengen announced that revenues for its 1989 fiscal year (ending March 31) totaled more than $41 million.  Dan Van Elderen remained Tengen COO and EVP.  Theodore M. Hoff (Ted Hoff) was Tengen SVP, sales and marketing (having replaced the departed Randy Broweleit).  Tengen so far had 14 titles available on the NES, including Gauntlet, Shinobi (title by Sega), After Burner (title by Sega) and Pac-Man.

June: Atari Games released Gumball Rally (redemption / non-video) and released Hydra (Mini-upright cabinet, or Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

June 26: Atari Games announced that it would repurchase the entire 43.8% share of the company held by one of its two largest outside shareholders, Namco-America, Inc.  In return, Namco would receive ownership of Atari Games' Atari Operations subsidiary, which operated approximately 40 video game arcades in the western and southeastern U.S.  A spokesman for Atari Games valued the transaction at $20 million. (SFChron)  Atari Games EVP Atari Operations Kevin Hayes, along with Atari Operations VPs Richard Adams and David Bishop, would depart the company to Namco as part of the transaction.  See: A History of Namco Operations (Atari Expo operator)

As a result, through its wholly owned subsidiary Warner Communications Inc., Time Warner Inc. went from owning a minority 40% share of Atari Games to owning a controlling majority (about 79%) share of Atari Games.

Time Warner logo 1990            Atari Games logo 1985-1996          Tengen logo

Hide Nakajima remained president of Atari Games.

Month?: Atari Games designer/programmer Dave Theurer departed the company.

July: At the Summer CES in Chicago Tengen introduced: Ms. Pac-Man (title by Namco) for NES and R.B.I. Baseball 2 for NES.  Additional spring/summer 1990 releases: Fantasy Zone (title by Sega) for NES and KLAX for NES.

July: Atari Games released ThunderJaws (Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

August 5-8: At the Video Software Dealers Association (VSDA) '90 convention in Las Vegas, Tengen announced the video game industry's first-ever "rent & sell" program.  Commtron Corp., the nation's largest pre-recorded video distributor, agreed to carry Tengen's full line of video games by fall 1990 for more than 25,000 video rental stores.

August: Atari Games released (3-player) Pit-Fighter (original release), and released Race Drivin' (original Deluxe Sitdown version).

August: Tengen released KLAX for TurboGrafx-16.

September 5: Atari Games senior staff engineer Jim Morris departed the company. (to Shographics, Inc.)

September: Tengen released KLAX for Genesis.

October: Atari Games released Race Drivin' (Deluxe Sitdown) Kit for Hard Drivin' Deluxe Cockpit units.

October/November: For the Lynx Atari Corporation shipped: RoadBlasters (title by Atari Games via Tengen), Paperboy (title by Atari Games via Tengen), KLAX (title by Atari Games via Tengen)

November: Atari Games released Tetris (Cabaret version), and released Shuuz (new unit, or conversion Kit for JAMMA units)

December: Atari Games released Race Drivin' (Compact Upright version).

December?: Tengen headquarters were relocated into the same building as the Atari Games headquarters: 675 Sycamore Dr, Milpitas CA.

1991
January 4: Assignee Atari Corporation gained assignor's interest in patent 4,445,114 from assignor Atari Games Corporation.

January 10-13: At the Winter CES in Las Vegas Atari Corporation announced for the Atari Lynx: Xybots (title by Atari Games via Tengen), Vindicators (title by Atari Games via Tengen; never shipped), A.P.B. (title by Atari Games via Tengen), Tournament Cyberball (title by Atari Games via Tengen).  

February 4: Jim Flack, previously of ARGOSystems, a subsidiary of The Boeing Company, joined Atari Games as Director of Simulation Products, a new division.

February 15: Domark announced the released of Hard Drivin' II (title by Atari Games via Tengen) for Commodore Amiga, Atari ST, and IBM PC. (NewsBytes)

February: Atari Games released (3-player) Rampart (original release).

March: Atari Games released 2-player Pit-Fighter (Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

March 27: Judge Fern Smith of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco granted Nintendo's request for a preliminary injunction against Atari Games, and ordered Atari Games to halt marketing, distribution, and sales of its NES-compatible cartridges. The court also required that Atari Games recall the cartridges.  The Court concluded that Atari Games lied to the U.S. copyright office to obtain a copy of Nintendo's software to assist in making its own version of the program. She said Atari Games told the authorities that it needed the software to defend against a copyright-infringement suit, when in fact Nintendo had not yet sued it on those grounds.  Atari Games would appeal.

April: Atari Games released Batman (Universal Kit for JAMMA units), released 2-player Rampart (Universal Kit for JAMMA units), and released Race Drivin' (Compact Upright) Kit for Hard Drivin' Compact Upright units.

April 11: Judge Fern Smith granted Atari Games a temporary stay of her March 27 ruling to let Atari Games present more information on the financial impact of the decision.

May: Atari Games released Race Drivin' (Panorama version).

May 21: U.S. District Judge Fern Smith suspended enforcement of her March 27 ruling against Atari Games and Tengen for six months or until the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled on the case, after Atari Games said it would close down Tengen and lay off 39 employees unless Smith stayed her order.

June 1-4: During the Summer CES in Chicago, from a suite at the nearby Barclay hotel, Atari Corporation announced/previewed for the Lynx: Rolling Thunder (title by Namco via Atari Games via Tengen; never shipped), Hard Drivin' (title by Atari Games via Tengen), S.T.U.N. Runner (title by Atari Games via Tengen)

June: Atari Games released Road Riot 4WD.

Month?: Atari Games game designer/artist Dave Ralston departed the company.

July 30: Atari Games announced the promotion of Mike Nevin to Managing Director/Vice President Operations of Atari Games Ireland Limited (previously: Managing Director of Atari Games Ireland Limited).

August: Mike Taylor, previously head of sales for Tengen, (again) became Vice President of Sales for Atari Games, replacing the departing Shane Breaks.  European sales would continue to be handled by David Smith (who had been filling for Breaks in the role).

August?: Through a new Lynx product catalog, Atari Corporation announced for the Lynx: 720° (Jun 92; title by Atari Games via Tengen; never shipped), Pit-Fighter (Mar 92; title by Atari Games via Tengen), Hydra (Mar 92; title by Atari Games via Tengen)

August: For the Lynx Atari Corporation shipped A.P.B. (Quicksilver Software).

September 3: Tengen Inc. announced that U.S. District Court Judge Fern Smith had agreed to extend a stay of her preliminary injunction against the company, allowing Tengen to continue making Nintendo-compatible video-game cartridges until it completed an appeal of the ruling. Smith's earlier stay, issued in May, was due to expire in mid-November. Tengen said that it expected to complete the appeal by spring 1992.

September: Atari Games released Steel Talons.

Fall: Tengen released Ms. Pac-Man (title by Namco) for Genesis, released R.B.I. Baseball 3 for NES and for Genesis, released Pac-Mania (title by Namco) for Genesis, released Pit-Fighter for Genesis, and re-released Pac-Man for NES.

October: Atari Games released Off the Wall (Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

October: Atari Games game maker John Salwitz departed the company.

October 30: Atari Games and Sega of America announced a strategic alliance. Atari Games and Sega said they would manufacture and market more than 40 software products for Sega video games systems in the United States and Europe over the next two years.  The games would be developed under Atari Games' Tengen software label. They would be compatible with Sega products including its Sega Master system, Genesis/Mega-Drive, and hand-held Game Gear units, plus the upcoming Sega CD/Mega-CD.  Dan Van Elderen was Tengen COO.

November: For the Lynx Atari Corporation shipped: Hard Drivin' (NuFX), S.T.U.N. Runner (title by Atari Games via Tengen)

December: For the Lynx Atari Corporation shipped: Tournament Cyberball, Xybots

1992
January 9-12: At the Winter CES in Las Vegas, for the Lynx Atari Corporation announced Steel Talons (title by Atari Games via Tengen).

April: Atari Games released Relief Pitcher.

April 27: Tengen announced it would be the exclusive U.S. distributor of Domark Ltd. entertainment software titles for play on the Sega Genesis and Sega Game Gear video game systems.  Tengen would market the products in the U.S. under the Domark brand name as part of its affiliated label program.  Domark was currently serving as sales and marketing representative for Tengen titles on Sega video game systems in Europe and Australia.  In addition, Domark had published Tengen video game titles, such as Hard Drivin', Pit-Fighter and the R.B.I. Baseball series, for personal computer systems in Europe since 1987.

May: Atari Games released Relief Pitcher (Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

May: Robert W. Pittman was one person serving on the board of directors of Atari Games.

May 29-June 1: During the Summer CES in Chicago, from their suite in a nearby downtown Chicago hotel, Atari Corporation promised for Lynx for June release: Rampart (title by Atari Games via Tengen), Road Riot 4WD (title by Atari Games via Tengen; never shipped)

June: Atari Games released Guardians of the 'Hood.

June: For the Lynx Atari Corporation shipped Rampart (title by Atari Games via Tengen) and Hydra (NuFX).

Summer: Tengen released James Bond 007: The Duel by Domark for Genesis (USA distribution), MiG-29 Fighter Pilot by Domark for Genesis (USA distribution), Prince of Persia by Domark, title by Brøderbund, for Game Gear (USA distribution), and Super Space Invaders by Domark, title by Taito, for Game Gear (USA distribution)

July: Atari Games released Guardians of the 'Hood Universal Kit (for JAMMA units), and released Moto Frenzy (original full-motion Deluxe version, 1-player).

August: Rich Moore remained vice president of engineering at Atari Games.

September: Atari Games released Moto Frenzy Mini-Deluxe (2-player version).

September 10: In the copyright infringement suit brought by Nintendo of America Inc. against Atari Games Corporation and its Tengen unit (975 F.2d 832), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, D.C. ruled that "reverse engineering" is a legitimate business practice, but that Atari Games had nevertheless infringed on Nintendo's copyrights through other actions.  The federal appeals court ordered Atari Games to stop making and selling its unauthorized Tengen game cartridges for the NES, as originally ruled by the district court on March 27, 1991.  (The district court's order had been stayed since April 11 1991, pending the appeal.)

September 15: Atari Games hardware engineer Jed Margolin departed the company.

September: Tengen released R.B.I. Baseball 4 for Genesis.

October 30: Assignee Atari Corporation gained assignor's interest in 6 patents from assignor Atari Games Corporation: 3,793,483; 4,054,919; 4,045,789; 4,016,362; 4,102,532; 4,116,444

Fall: Tengen released Rampart for Genesis.

Fall: Accolade release Tengen's Arcade Hits by Domark, for PC and for Amiga, featuring the Tengen titles: APB (Walking Circles), Escape From the Planet of the Robot Monsters (Teque), Hard Drivin' II (Jurgen Friedrich), Klax (Teque), and Toobin' (Teque)

November: Atari Games released Space Lords.

November 16-20: At the fall COMDEX in Las Vegas, Atari Corporation showed/previewed four games commissioned by Atari for the Falcon030 including Steel Talons (Koveos; title by Atari Games via Tengen; would be shipped by 16/32 Systems)

November 18: Atari Corporation announced it had shipped Steel Talons (NuFX) for the Atari Lynx.

November 20: The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit reversed a trial judge's ruling against Atari Games and said the Copyright Office had lacked a "rational basis" for refusing to issue a copyright for the game, Breakout, to Atari Games.  Breakout had been created by Atari in 1975 and released in 1976.  Atari Games had sought to formally register Breakout with the US Copyright Office on Feb. 6, 1987, but the Copyright Office refused to register the copyright on the basis that the work "did not contain at least a minimum amount of original pictorial or graphic authorship, or authorship in sounds."  Atari Games' move to register Breakout with the Copyright Office was necessitated by their legal action for copyright infringement against Romstar for Romstar's 1986 Breakout-like arcade game, Arkanoid by Taito.

1993
January 7-10: At the Winter CES in Las Vegas, from a nearby hotel suite showroom, Atari Corporation announced for the Atari Lynx: Relief Pitcher (title by Atari Games via Tengen; never shipped)

January 25: Geoffrey W. Holmes was named Time Warner SVP technology (previously: SVP).  Holmes would be responsible for interactive multimedia throughout TW, including continued responsibility for Warner New Media, but now also including responsibility for Atari Games (78%-owned by TW), the Quantum project at Warner's cable operation, and 3DO Inc.  Holmes was the first appointment by brand-new new Time Warner Chairman and CEO Gerald M. Levin.

January/February: Atari Corporation released Pit-Fighter for Lynx.

March: Atari Games released Knuckle Bash by Toaplan (Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

March 24-30: At CeBIT '93 in Hanover, Germany, Atari Corporation introduced/showed games commissioned by Atari Corporation for the Falcon030 including Road Riot 4WD (Koveos; title by Atari Games via Tengen; would be shipped by 16/32 Systems).

April 2: Tengen announced the signing of Dick Vitale to a multi-year contract to develop video games designed and endorsed by the basketball announcer.  The first of these games, code-named "Dick Vitale's Awesome Baby Basketball," (would ship as: Dick Vitale's "Awesome, Baby" College Hoops) was planned for release by Christmas 1993 for Genesis.

April: New logo for the Atari Games majority owner, Time Warner Inc.

Time Warner logo 1993            Atari Games logo 1985-1996          Tengen logo

May 17: U.S. District Court Judge Fern Smith issued a summary judgment in favor of Nintendo and against Atari Games, ruling that it infringed on a Nintendo patent and copyrighted program by improperly circumventing a security system intended to prevent unlicensed software developers from producing game software for play on Nintendo's home entertainment console, the NES.  The Court accepted Nintendo's accusation that Atari Games had illicitly obtained details of Nintendo's security system from the US Copyright Office in 1987.  Atari Games said they would appeal.  The ruling set the stage for several trials to settle: Atari Games' claim that Nintendo's security system patent was invalid, Atari Games' claim that Nintendo's business violated U.S. antitrust laws, and Nintendo's claim that Atari Games' patent infringement was willful.

June: Atari Games released World Rally by Gaelco (Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

Month?: Atari Games VP Engineering Rich Moore departed the company.  Brad Fuller, previously director of audio, would become director of engineering.

July 29: In a trial held before U.S. District Court Judge Fern Smith in San Francisco, an eight-person federal jury unanimously held that Nintendo's patent related to a security system, granted in 1989, was valid.  Damages weren't set.  Atari Games said it would appeal.  The jury rejected a claim by Nintendo that Atari had infringed its packaging trademarks.  At least two additional trials to settle legal disputes between the two companies remained in the works.

Summer: Tengen introduced Davis Cup Tennis, Gauntlet IV and Awesome Possum, each for Genesis.

August: Atari Games designer Mark Pierce became Senior VP Product Development.

October: Atari Games released the Showcase 33 (universal cabinet for kits up to four players).

September: Tengen released Robo Aleste (title by Compile) for Sega CD.

November 4: Atari Games announced that they would be using the Jaguar by Atari Corporation as a board for arcade games (hardware would be known as: CoJag). 

November: Tengen released Gauntlet IV for Genesis, released Awesome Possum for Genesis, and released Formula One by Domark for Genesis (USA distribution).

December: Tengen released PGA Tour Golf by Electronic Arts for Game Gear, released Desert Strike by Domark for Game Gear (USA distribution), released F1 by Domark for Game Gear (USA distribution), released Dragon's Revenge for Genesis, and released Race Drivin' for Genesis.

1994
March 24: Nintendo of America and Atari Games jointly announced that they had settled all litigation between them concerning alleged patent and copyright infringements and antitrust violations.  Most terms of the settlement were confidential, however, both parties announced the following: (1) All of the claims of the parties were dismissed, including judgments of patent infringement and copyright infringement previously awarded to Nintendo against Atari Games; (2) Nintendo would receive certain payments in connection with the settlement as well as certain patent licenses from Atari Games; and (3) Atari Games would again become a Nintendo licensee.

March 29: Atari Games acquired 70,000 shares of Atari Corporation Common Stock as license royalty payment for the publishing by Atari Corporation of versions of Atari Games games on Lynx (18 titles), ST (3 titles), 7800 (5 titles), and 2600 (1 title) through December 31, 1993.

April 11: The three Time Warner game and multimedia units, Time Warner Interactive Group (TWIG; known as Warner New Media from 1984-1993; developer of CD-ROM entertainment titles and interactive TV applications), Atari Games, and Tengen announced that they planned to integrate their operations and operate under the common name, Time Warner Interactive.  Geoff Holmes was chairman of Time Warner Interactive.  Dennis Wood, senior vice president of Atari Games, said the decision wouldn't cause any reductions among the combined 210 employees of Atari Games and Tengen.

April/May: Tengen SVP marketing and sales Ted Hoff departed the company.

May?: Tengen released R.B.I. Baseball '94, title by Atari Games, for Genesis.

May 27: A Certificate of Amendment of Articles of Incorporation was executed by Tengen VP Dan Van Elderen and Tengen secretary Dennis Wood, changing the name of Tengen Inc. to: Time Warner Interactive (California) Inc.

June 22: On the eve of the Summer CES in Chicago, the new Time Warner Interactive brand was unveiled by the newly-integrated Time Warner units, Time Warner Interactive Inc. (previously named Time Warner Interactive Group Inc, the former Warner New Media), Atari Games Corporation, and Time Warner Interactive (California) Inc. (TWIC, the Atari Games subsidiary previously known as Tengen).  Time Warner Interactive Inc., located in Burbank CA, would be known as the TWi Entertainment division, while Atari Games and TWIC, co-located in Milpitas CA, would together be known as the TWi Games division.  Geoff Holmes was chairman, Time Warner Interactive.

Time Warner logo 1993          Atari Games logo 1985-1996          Time Warner Interactive logo       

June 23-25: At the Summer CES in Chicago (the final Summer CES to be held), Time Warner Interactive featured more than 15 PC CD-ROM titles, including Peter & the Wolf, Woodstock: 25th Anniversary CD-ROM and Seinfeld Screensaver & Planner; 20 Sega and Nintendo titles including Sylvester & Tweety in Cagey Capers, Dick Vitale's "Awesome, Baby" College Hoops and R.B.I. Baseball '94; and three arcade games, Primal Rage, T-MEK and Metal Maniax (never shipped).  Geoff Holmes was chairman, Time Warner Interactive.

June 28: The name of Tengen Inc. was changed to: Time Warner Interactive (California) Inc.

Month?: Lyle Rains, previously Atari Games SVP Engineering, became Atari Games Chief Corporate Engineer/Senior Producer.

Month?: Atari Games marketing director Mary Fujihara, with Atari since February 1979, became vice president of marketing.

Month?: Pat Pickham became the new Managing Director of Atari Games Ireland Limited, replacing the departing Mike Nevin.

July: Time Warner Interactive released T-MEK by Atari Games.

July 11: Passing of Atari Games president Hideyuki Nakajima.

July 12: Atari announced an agreement with Time Warner Interactive (TWi) whereby the Jaguar technology engine would be available for use in Time Warner Interactive's arcade games, and arcade titles developed by TWi on the Jaguar platform would also be available for Atari's Jaguar consumer console.  Geoff Holmes remained CEO of Time Warner Interactive.

August: Time Warner Interactive released Deluxe Showcase 33in. Primal Rage (original release) by Atari Games.

August: Time Warner Interactive released Sylvester & Tweety in Cagey Capers by TecMagik for Genesis and Mega Drive.

Summer/Fall: Time Warner Interactive released Dick Vitale's "Awesome, Baby" College Hoops for Genesis and Mega Drive.

September 6: Time Warner Interactive announced Rise of the Robots, developed by Mirage, for PC CD-ROM and for PC SVGA Floppy Disk in North America, and for a total of 10 platforms in Europe.  Dan Van Elderen remained president, Time Warner Interactive Games Division.

September 6: WCI Games Corporation was established as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Communications Inc.

September: Time Warner Interactive released 25in. Upright Primal Rage by Atari Games.

September: Masao Ohata, previously of Jaleco, joined Time Warner Interactive/Atari Games as vice president of international business (outside the Americas and Europe).

September 20: Date of Agreement of Merger by and between Atari Games Corporation (4,877,100 shares outstanding) and the wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Communications Inc., WCI Games Corporation (100 shares outstanding)

September 23: WCI Games Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Communications Inc. (WCI), was merged into Atari Games Corporation.  Issued and outstanding shares of Atari Games not held by WCI (21% share held by employee-owners) were converted into the right to receive $3.75 per share in cash; shares already owned by WCI (79% share) were cancelled.  Issued and outstanding common stock shares of WCI Games became common stock shares of Atari Games.  Existing directors and officers of Atari Games would remain in place.  Result: Atari Games became a wholly owned subsidiary of WCI, itself a unit of Time Warner Inc.  Dennis Wood was Atari Games senior VP, Berry Kane was Atari Games assistant secretary; Peter R. Haje was WCI Games president, Marie N. White was WCI Games assistant secretary.

October: Time Warner Interactive released Cops by Atari Games.

October: Time Warner Interactive released Battlecorps by Core Design for Sega CD.

November: Time Warner Interactive released The Lawnmower Man by SCi for Sega CD and Genesis (and Mega Drive), released Rise of the Robots for PC CD-ROM and for PC floppy, released Generations Lost for Genesis, released Red Zone for Genesis and for Mega Drive, released Marko by Domark for Genesis (USA distribution), released PGA Tour Golf II by Electronic Arts for Game Gear, and released R.B.I. Baseball '94 for Game Gear.

November 21: Time Warner Interactive announced the signing of Wayne Gretzky to an exclusive three-year, multi-platform license for a line of interactive hockey products, and announced a license had been signed with The National Hockey League Players' Association (NHLPA) to provide the game with real player names, profiles and statistics. Both licenses provided that Time Warner Interactive develop and distribute for all arcade and consumer systems including upcoming CD-ROM-based platforms.  Dan Van Elderen remained President of Time Warner Interactive, Games Division.

December 5: Time Warner Interactive, Inc., Games Division announced shipment of Red Zone for Genesis.  Mark Beaumont was Sr. Vice President Product Development and Marketing, Time Warner Interactive, Games Division.

December 12: Time Warner Interactive, Inc., Games Division announced shipment of Generations Lost for Sega Genesis.  Mark Beaumont remained Sr. Vice President, Product Development and Marketing, Time Warner Interactive, Games Division.

December: Time Warner Interactive released Soul Star by Core Design for Sega CD, released Rise of the Robots for Game Gear, and released PGA Tour Golf II by Electronic Arts for Game Gear (Europe).

1995
January 6-9: At the Winter Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Time Warner Interactive, Inc., Games Division announced, and previewed at the nearby St. Tropez Hotel: Kawasaki SuperBike Challenge by Domark for Genesis, SNES, and Game Gear (all versions due March 1995), Power Drive Rally by Rage Software for Jaguar (earlier: Rage Rally;  expected May 1995), Striker '95 by Rage Software for PC CD-ROM or floppy (expected April 1995), Wayne Gretzky and the NHLPA All-Stars for Genesis (expected April 1995; SNES, PC CD-ROM, Jaguar and arcade versions expected fall 1995), Payne Stewart Pro Golf for Genesis (expected spring 1995; never shipped), R.B.I. Baseball '95, title by Atari Games, for Sega CD and 32X (spring 1995; Sega CD version never shipped).  Mark Beaumont remained SVP Product Development and Marketing, Time Warner Interactive, Games Division.

February: Time Warner Interactive released BC Racers by Core Design for Sega CD.

March: Time Warner Interactive released Primal Rage Universal Kit (for Showcase 33 units, or 2-player upright JAMMA units).

March: Time Warner Interactive released Mega SWIV for Mega Drive.

March 21: Time Warner Interactive, Games Division announced shipment of Kawasaki SuperBike Challenge, title by Domark, for Genesis (and Mega Drive), and Game Gear (USA distribution), with SNES version to ship June 1995.  Mark Beaumont remained Senior Vice President of Marketing and Product Development at Time Warner Interactive, Games Division.

April 11: Time Warner Interactive, Inc., Consumer Games Division (TWi) announced Primal Rage for eleven platforms, to ship August 25, 1995 for Genesis, SNES, Game Gear, Game Boy and PC CD-ROM, and to ship November 14, 1995 for Saturn, 32X, 3DO (3DO version would be shipped by LG/Goldstar), Playstation, Jaguar, and Macintosh CD-ROM.  Mark Beaumont remained Senior Vice President, Marketing and Product Development at TWi.

April 7: Geoff Holmes resigned as chairman of Time Warner Interactive, which would now be overseen by a five-member Time Warner corporate board managed by Home Box Office (HBO) EVP John K. Billock.

April 18: LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc., formerly Goldstar U.S.A., Inc., announced an agreement with Time Warner Interactive (TWi) to license Primal Rage for 3DO, due out in November 1995.  Mark Beaumont remained senior vice president of marketing/product development for Time Warner Interactive.

May 8: Time Warner Interactive, Inc. (TWi) announced the appointment of Dan Van Elderen as President and Chief Operating Officer (C.O.O.) over world wide operations for its coin-operated arcade division (Atari Games; replacing the deceased Hideyuki Nakajima in the role); he would also continue as president and COO of the TWi consumer games group (Time Warner Interactive (California)).  Based in Milpitas CA, the TWi Games Division employed about 400 people world-wide, including locations in New York, London, Tipperary Ireland, Paris, and Tokyo.

May 11-13: At the (first-ever) Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3), held the Los Angeles Convention Center, Time Warner Interactive, Inc., Consumer Games Division (TWi) promoted Primal Rage for 8 platforms, to ship August 25 for Genesis, SNES, Game Gear, Game Boy and PC CD-ROM, and to ship November 14 for Saturn, 32X, 3DO, PlayStation, Jaguar, and Macintosh CD-ROM; Power Drive Rally for Jaguar, to ship in June; T-MEK for PC CD-ROM and for 32X, both to ship in October; V.R. Virtua Racing for Saturn, to ship in Japan in June and in the U.S. for the Saturn's launch on September 2; Wayne Gretzky and the NHLPA All-Stars for PC CD-ROM, Jaguar, and SNES, with the initial Genesis version to ship May 26.  TWi also announced that they had signed an agreement with Prolific Publishing, Inc. for the world-wide rights to publish Return Fire (title by Silent Software) for PC CD-ROM (late fall 1995 release) and for Playstation and Saturn (early 1996 release; Saturn version never shipped).  Mark Beaumont remained Senior Vice President Marketing and Product Development Time Warner Interactive, Games Division.

June 1: The Time Warner Interactive Inc. Games Division announced the shipment of RBI Baseball '95, title by Atari Games, for 32X, and the shipment of Super R.B.I. Baseball, title by Atari Games, for SNES.

June 12: Time Warner Interactive, Consumer Games Division (TWi) announced the shipment of Wayne Gretzky and the NHLPA All-Stars for Genesis (and Mega Drive).  An SNES version was to ship in early fall, with Jaguar and DOS CD-ROM versions following in late 1995. Mark Beaumont remained Senior Vice President Product Development and Marketing at Time Warner Interactive, Games Division.

June: Time Warner Interactive released Striker '95 by Rage Software for PC CD-ROM or floppy (both Europe only), and released Rise of the Robots for PC floppy, for Amiga, and for Game Gear (all Europe only).

Month?: Atari Games Chief Corporate Engineer/Senior Producer Lyle Rains departed the company.

July: Time Warner Interactive released Striker '95 by Rage Software for PC CD-ROM (rest of world).

August 25: Time Warner Interactive, Consumer Games Division (TWi) announced the release of Primal Rage for Genesis, SNES, Game Gear, Game Boy, and PC CD-ROM.  November 14 was the scheduled release date for Primal Rage for Saturn, 32X, 3DO, Playstation, Jaguar, and Macintosh CD-ROM.  Mark Beaumont remained Senior Vice President Marketing and Product Development.

September: Time Warner Interactive released Hoop It Up (redemption / non-video) by Atari Games.

September: Time Warner Interactive released Primal Rage for PC CD-ROM (USA & rest of world), for Game Boy (rest of world), and for Mega Drive.

September 16: Time Warner Interactive's "National 'Primal Rage' Video-Game Tournament" held at Six Flags Over Texas (Arlington, Texas; property managed by another unit of Time Warner)

October: Time Warner Interactive Inc., otherwise known as the TWi Entertainment division located in Burbank CA, along with another Time Warner unit, WarnerActive, would be rolled into a third Time Warner unit, Inscape, a CD-ROM joint venture created by Home Box Office, Warner Music Group and Nash New Media.  Atari Games and its Time Warner Interactive (California) subsidiary, together known as the TWi Games division (with about 300 employees in Milpitas CA), would continue to do business as Time Warner Interactive.

October 9: Time Warner Interactive (TWi) announced the release of Power Drive Rally for Jaguar.

Fall?: Time Warner Interactive released T-MEK for 32X.

November 6: Time Warner Interactive announced the release of V.R. Virtua Racing, title by Sega, for Saturn.  Mark Beaumont remained Senior Vice President of Marketing and Product Development at TWi.

November 8: Time Warner Interactive (TWi) announced the imminent release of Last Gladiators Digital Pinball, licensed from from KAZe of Japan, for Saturn.  Mark Beaumont remained Senior Vice President of Marketing and Product Development at TWi.

November 13: Time Warner Interactive (TWi) announced the promotion of Stephen Wahid to Director of Product Development for the company's European operation located in Manchester, England. Dan Van Elderen remained President and C.O.O. of Time Warner Interactive.

November: Time Warner Interactive released Area 51 by Atari Games, developed by Mesa Logic, 33" Showcase and 25" versions (incorporating CoJag hardware based on Jaguar by Atari Corporation).

November 20: Time Warner Interactive (TWi) announced the imminent release in North America of Zero Divide, developed by Zoom in Japan, for PlayStation.  Mark Beaumont remained Senior Vice President of Marketing and Product Development for TWi.

December 4: Nintendo of America annoucned that Time Warner Interactive would release a 3-D hockey game starring Wayne Gretzky for Nintendo Ultra 64 in the fall of 1996. The game would be based on Time Warner Interactive's coin-op hockey game to be launched in arcades during spring 1996.  Dan Van Elderen remained president of Time Warner Interactive.

December: Time Warner Interactive released Wayne Gretzky and the NHLPA All-Stars for SNES, released Kawasaki Superbike Challenge for SNES, released Last Gladiators Digital Pinball for Saturn.

December 12: Time Warner Interactive (TWi) announced the release of Wayne Gretzky and the NHLPA All-Stars for PC CD-ROM. (The Genesis and SNES versions were released previously.)

December 13: The Wall Street Journal reported that Time Warner wanted to sell Time Warner Interactive (Atari Games).

December 19: Time Warner Interactive announced the release of Primal Rage for PlayStation, and that the Jaguar version would ship on December 21.

December 19: Time Warner Interactive (TWi) announced the release in the U.S. of Zero Divide by Zoom for PlayStation.

December 20: Time Warner Interactive (TWi) donated $15,000 worth of Sylvester and Tweety Bird stuffed animals to CityTeam Ministries.  Dan Van Elderen remained TWi's President and Chief Operating Officer.

1996
Winter: Time Warner Interactive released Area 51 Universal Kit (Conversion Kit for Two-Player Upright Games) by Atari Games, developed by Mesa Logic.

February 12: At the 93rd American International Toy Fair in New York, Playmates Toys introduced its line of "Primal Rage" action figures, properties liceised from Time Warner Interactive.  Other Primal Rage licsensed products would include: handheld games from Tiger Electronics, novels from Berkley Books, comic books from Sirius Entertainment, apparel from SeaBell and Logotel, watches from Innovative Time, children's footwear from Foot-Tec Industries, and pre-paid phone cards from GTI Telecom.  Derryl DePriest was TWi Product Manager. 

February 15: WMS Industries established the wholly owned subsidiary, Williams Interactive Inc.

February 23: Warner Communications agreed to sell all of the outstanding stock of Atari Games to Williams Interactive Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of WMS Industries, Inc.

March 5: WMS Industries Inc. announced that one of its affiliates (Williams Interactive Inc.) had entered into an agreement to acquire Atari Games Corporation, the indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Time Warner Inc. The purchase price was not disclosed.

March?: Time Warner Interactive released Return Fire for PlayStation (USA).

March?: Warner Interactive released Return Fire, licensed to Time Warner Interactive, for PlayStation (Europe).

March?: Warner Interactive released Return Fire, licensed to Time Warner Interactive, for PC CD-ROM (Europe).

March?: Warner Interactive released T-MEK, licensed to Time Warner Interactive, for PC CD-ROM (Europe).

March 29: Through its wholly owned subsidiary Williams Interactive Inc., WMS Industries Inc. completed the acquisition of Atari Games Corporation, the indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Time Warner Inc., for a minimum purchase price of approximately $9.8 million and a maximum of $23.8 million based upon gross profit of the Atari business over the next four years. The purchase consideration consisted of $2 million in cash and the balance in non-recourse notes.  Included in the transaction were the wholly owned subsidiaries of Atari Games: Atari Games Ireland Limited, Time Warner Interactive (California) Inc. (the former Tengen), and K.K. Time Warner Interactive (Japan).

WMS Industries logo          Williams logo          Atari Games logo 1996-2000

Neil D. Nicastro, President and Co-CEO of WMS Industries, became Chairman and CEO of Atari Games.  Louis J. Nicastro was Chairman and Co-CEO of WMS Industries. 

At Atari Games: Dan Van Elderen remained president and COO; Dennis Wood departed the company; director of engineering Brad Fuller would depart the company; Mark Pierce remained Senior VP Product Development; Steve Calfee, previously Time Warner Interactive (California) VP product development, would become Atari Games VP new technology.

Domestic Atari Games manufacturing would shift from California (735 Sycamore Dr, Milpitas) to the Williams plant in Waukegan, Illinois.  Atari Games offices and engineering would remain at 675 Sycamore Dr., Milpitas CA.

May: Atari Games hardware designer Pat McCarthy departed the company.

Spring/Summer?: GT Interactive released Return Fire by Williams Entertainment (licensed to Atari Games) for PC CD-ROM (USA).

June: Steve Ritchie, previously of Williams/Bally-Midway (and with Atari from 1974-1978), joined Atari Games as senior staff producer. (RePlay 7/97 pA63)

June 26: Neil Nicastro became (sole) CEO, and remained president, of WMS Industries.  Louis Nicastro remained chairman of WMS Industries.

July 1: WMS Industries transferred 100% of the stock of Midway Interactive Inc. (formerly Williams Interactive Inc.), including Atari Games Corp, to the WMS Industries subsidiary, Midway Games, Inc.

Additionally, WMS Industries transferred out of its Midway Games subsidiary all of the operating assets and liabilities relating to the Bally pinball business previously conducted by Midway Games; WMS Industries transferred the coin-operated video game operating assets and liabilities not previously part of Midway Games from other WMS Industries subsidiaries in to Midway Games; and, WMS Industries transferred 100% of the stock of Midway Home Entertainment Inc. (formerly Williams Entertainment Inc.) in to Midway Games.

WMS Industries logo           Midway Games logo           Atari Games logo 1996-2000

Neil Nicastro was President and Co-CEO of Midway Games.  Louis Nicastro was Chairman and Co-CEO of Midway Games.  Dan Van Elderen remained president/COO of Atari Games.

July 26: Neil Nicastro became chairman and (sole) CEO, and also remained president, of Midway Games.

August 21: A Certificate of Amendment of Articles of Incorporation of Time Warner Interactive (California) Inc. was executed by Tengen VP finance and treasurer Harold H. Bach, Jr. and VP and secretary Barbara M. Norman, changing the name of the company to: Tengen, Inc.

September 10: The name of Time Warner Interactive (California) Inc. (the wholly own subsidiary of Atari Games) was changed to: Tengen, Inc.  (There were no new plans to use the Tengen brand, however.)

September/October: Midway Home Entertainment released Area 51 by Atari Games for Saturn.

September/October: GT Interactive released Area 51 by Midway (Atari Games) for PC CD-ROM.

October: Atari Games released The NHLPA & NHL Present Wayne Gretzky's 3D Hockey (new unit, or Universal Kit for JAMMA units).

October 18: Media report that Atari Games Ireland Limited, the Atari Games European manufacturing facility in Tipperary, Ireland, in operation since it had been established by Atari, Inc. back in 1978, had been purchased from WMS by Namco Ltd.  Atari Games would contract with Namco to continue to supply the Atari Games product to Europe on its behalf.  50 people were employed at the plant.   (The Irish Times 10/18/96 supp p4)

October 20: Midway Games completed an Initial Public Offering of 5,100,000 common shares of stock at $20.00/share, for $93,700,000. Parent company WMS Industries still held 33,400,000 common shares, or 86.8%, of Midway Games.

Fall: WizardWorks Software released T-MEK by Midway (Atari Games) for PC CD-ROM (USA).

November 14?: Midway Home Entertainment released The NHLPA & NHL Present Wayne Gretzky's 3D Hockey developed by Atari Games for N64.

November: Midway Home Entertainment released Area 51 by Atari Games for PlayStation.

December: Atari Games released San Francisco Rush: Extreme Racing.

December 20?: Midway Home Entertainment released Arcade's Greatest Hits: The Atari Collection 1, compilation by Atari Games, developed by Digital Eclipse, for PlayStation, featuring: Asteroids, Battlezone, Centipede, Missile Command, Super Breakout, and Tempest (all properties licensed from Atari Corporation).

1997
January 15: Namco changed the name of its newly-acquired Atari Games Ireland Limited subsidiary to: Namco Ireland Limited

March: Atari Games released Maximum Force (Showcase 39" or Standard 25" versions) developed by Mesa Logic (incorporating CoJag hardware based on Jaguar by Atari Corporation).

April 15: Agreement between Midway Interactive (formerly Williams Interactive) and Warner Communications settling final terms of the purchase of Atari Games as originally agreed on 2/23/96 and executed on 3/29/96.

May: Atari Games released Mace: The Dark Age (original 25" Dedicated Game release).

June 16: Atari Games released Mace: The Dark Age (Universal Kit).

June 16: At E3 in Atlanta, Midway Home Entertainment introduced Mace: The Dark Age for the Nintendo 64 and Sony PlayStation; never shipped on PlayStation (due Sept 97), Maximum Force for Sony PlayStation (due Sept 97), and The NHLPA & NHL Present Wayne Gretzky's 3D Hockey '98 for the Nintendo 64 and Sony PlayStation (due Nov 97).

July 14?: Midway Home Entertainment released Arcade's Greatest Hits: The Atari Collection 1, compilation by Atari Games, developed by Digital Eclipse, for Saturn, featuring: Asteroids, Battlezone, Centipede, Missile Command, Super Breakout, and Tempest (all properties licensed from Atari Corporation).

July: At Atari Games: Dan Van Elderen remained president, Mary Fujihara remained VP marketing, Mark Pierce remained VP product development, Masao Ohata remained VP international business, Mike Taylor remained VP sales (domestic), Steve Calfee remained VP new technology (engineering), Peter Takaichi remained design services director, Elaine Shirley remained regional sales manager (Dallas TX), Tom Keil remained Eastern regional sales manager (Charlotte NC), Rob Rowe remained senior producer, Steve Ritchie remained senior staff producer, and Al Vernon remained a customer service representative.  (RePlay 7/97)

Summer: Atari Games employed about 160 people.

August?: Midway Home Entertainment released Arcade's Greatest Hits: The Atari Collection 1, compilation by Atari Games, developed by Digital Eclipse, for SNES, featuring: Asteroids, Battlezone, Centipede, Missile Command, Super Breakout, and Tempest (all properties licensed from Atari Corporation).

September: Atari Games released Maximum Force (Universal kit for JAMMA units).

October 1?: Midway Home Entertainment released Mace: The Dark Age developed by Atari Games for N64.

November 8?: Midway Home Entertainment released San Francisco Rush: Extreme Racing developed by Atari Games for N64.

November: Atari Games released San Francisco Rush the Rock: Alcatraz Edition (new unit, or conversion kit for San Francisco Rush units).

November 17?: Midway Home Entertainment released Maximum Force by Atari Games, developed by Mesa Logic, converted by Perfect Entertainment, for PlayStation and for Saturn.

December: Midway Home Entertainment released The NHL & NHLPA Present Wayne Gretzky's 3D Hockey '98 by Atari Games for N64 and for PlayStation.

December 16: At Tengen, Inc., Neil D. Nicastro remained CEO and sole director, Orrin J. Edidin remained VP and secretary, and Joseph (Mickey) Lynch remained CFO.  The unit's official address remained 625 Sycamore Drive, Milpitas CA.

1998
January: Atari Games released California Speed (Classic 25" or Deluxe 33" versions) and released Surf Planet by Gaelco (Universal Kit).

January: Atari Games Vice-President of New Technology Steve Calfee departed the company.

February 23?: Midway Home Entertainment released Olympic Hockey 98  (Olympic Hockey Nagano '98) by Atari Games for N64.

February 28?: Midway Home Entertainment released San Francisco Rush: Extreme Racing developed by Atari Games, ported by Climax Development for PlayStation.

April 1: Midway Home Entertainment announced the release of Arcade's Greatest Hits: The Atari Collection 2, compilation by Atari Games, developed by Digital Eclipse, for PlayStation (USA), featuring Millipede (title licensed from Atari Corporation), Crystal Castles (title licensed from Atari Corporation), and the Atari Games titles: Paperboy, Gauntlet, RoadBlasters, Marble Madness

April 6: WMS Industries completed its spin off to shareholders of its entire stake of Midway Games, making Midway Games, Inc. an independent entity.  Atari Games remained a division of Midway Games.  Neil Nicastro continued as chairman, president, and CEO of Midway Games.  Dan Van Elderen continued as president/COO of Atari Games.

Midway Games logo         Atari Games logo 1996-2000

June: Atari Games released Radikal Bikers by Gaelco, and released the Area 51/Maximum Force Duo Kit (Universal kit for JAMMA units, including Area 51 and Maximum Force units) developed by Mesa Logic (incorporating CoJag hardware based on Jaguar by Atari Corporation).

June: GT Interactive released Arcade's Greatest Hits: The Atari Collection 2 by Midway, compilation by Atari Games, developed by Digital Eclipse, for PlayStation (Europe), featuring Millipede (title licensed from Atari Corporation), Crystal Castles (title licensed from Atari Corporation), and the Atari Games titles: Paperboy, Gauntlet, RoadBlasters, Marble Madness

August: Atari Games released Vapor TRX developed by Blue Shift.

October: Atari Games released Area 51 Site 4 developed by Mesa Logic (Showcase 39" or Standard 25" versions), and released Gauntlet Legends (Deluxe Showcase 39" or Showcase 27" versions).

October: At Tengen, Inc., Neil D. Nicastro remained CEO and sole director, Orrin J. Edidin remained VP and secretary, and Joseph (Mickey) Lynch remained CFO.  The unit's official address remained 625 Sycamore Drive, Milpitas CA.

November 10?: Midway Home Entertainment released Rush 2: Extreme Racing USA developed by Atari Games for N64.

1999
Winter: Midway Home Entertainment released Arcade's Greatest Hits: The Atari Collection 2, compilation by Atari Games, developed by Digital Eclipse, for PC, featuring the Atari Games titles: Paperboy, Gauntlet, RoadBlasters, 720°, Marble Madness, Vindicators

February: Atari Games released the Area 51 Site 4 conversion kit developed by Mesa Logic.

March 4: Midway Home Entertainment announced the release of 720˚, title by Atari Games, converted by Digital Eclipse, for Game Boy Color.

March: Atari Games released War: Final Assault.

March 17: Midway Home Entertainment announced the release of California Speed, developed by Atari Games, for N64.

April 1: Midway Home Entertainment announced the release of KLAX, developed by Digital Eclipse, title by Atari Games, for Game Boy Color (the first Game Boy title incompatible with the original Game Boy).

April: Atari Games released Road Burners.

April: Atari Games Marketing VP Mary Fujihara departed the company.

May 13: At the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) in Los Angeles, Midway Home Entertainment introduced Paperboy, title by Atari Games, for N64 and PlayStation, to ship fall 1999, and for Game Boy Color, to ship May 1999; and also introduced Gauntlet Legends, title by Atari Games, for N64 and PlayStation, to ship fall 1999.

May?: Atari Games released the Gauntlet Legends conversion kit.

May 21: Namco Ireland Limited (the former Atari Games Ireland Limited) announced the closure of the manufacturing plant at Tipperary.

June 25: Atari Games announced the release of San Francisco Rush 2049.

June 30: A Certificate of Dissolution of Tengen, Inc. was executed by Tengen sole director, chairman and CEO Neil D. Nicastro.

Month?: Atari Games software engineer David Akers departed the company.

September: Midway Home Entertainment released Gauntlet Legends developed by Atari Games for N64.

September 22: The Tengen, Inc. subsidiary of Atari Games was dissolved.

Fall?: Atari Games Vice President of Sales Mike Taylor, with Atari Games since October 1986, departed the company.

November 4: Midway Home Entertainment announced the release of Paperboy, developed by High Voltage Software, title by Atari Games, for N64.

November 17?: Midway Home Entertainment released Arcade Party Pak, developed by Digital Eclipse, for PlayStation, featuring Rampage, Smash TV, and the Atari Games titles: 720°, KLAX, Toobin', Super Sprint

November 19: Certificate of Amendment of Articles of Incorporation executed for Atari Games Corporation by CEO Neil D. Nicastro and secretary Orrin J. Edidin, changing the name of the company to: Midway Games West Inc.  Use of the Atari Games brand would be discontinued, in favor of the Midway brand.  The number of outstanding shares of the company was 100.

Midway Games logo          Midway Games West Inc.

2000
Winter: Midway Games released Gauntlet: Dark Legacy by Midway Games West (25" or 39" Game Cabinet versions), and released Skins Game developed by Midway Games West.

February 28:  Midway Games West announced that Mark Beaumont had joined the company as Senior Vice President, Business Development.  He was most recently Executive Vice President and General Manager of Psygnosis U.S.

March 30: Midway Home Entertainment released Gauntlet Legends by Midway Games West for PlayStation.

April: Midway Games West Senior VP Product Development Mark Pierce departed the company.

May 18: Midway Home Entertainment released Toobin' by Midway Games West, developed by Digital Eclipse, for Game Boy Color.

June 6: Midway Home Entertainment released Gauntlet Legends developed by Midway Games West for Dreamcast.

Spring/Summer?: Midway Games released the Gauntlet: Dark Legacy conversion kit developed by Midway Games West (for Gauntlet Legends and JAMMA units).

July: Midway Games West Senior Staff Engineer Mike Albaugh, with Atari since March 1976, departed the company.

September 5: Midway Home Entertainment released San Francisco Rush 2049 developed by Midway Games West for N64, for DreamCast, and for Game Boy Color (GBC conversion by Hand Held Games).

2001
January: Midway Games West vice president of international business (outside the Americas and Europe) Masao Ohata departed the company.

March 6: Midway Games reduced its coin-operated video game work force by approximately 60 employees.

Winter/Spring?: Team Play released the coin-operated Classic Arcade Centipede/Missile Command/Millipede (25" upright) developed by Cosmodog; titles by Infogrames Interactive, Inc., used under license from Midway Games West, Inc.

May 1: Midway Home Entertainment released Gauntlet Dark Legacy by Midway Games West for PS2.

June 22: Midway Games announced its exit from the coin-operated arcade video game market; it would now develop and publish software exclusively for home systems through its subsidiary, Midway Home Entertainment.  As a result of the decision, Midway Games West canceled all development work on new coin-operated games (including Hot Rod Rebels), but would continue operations as a development studio for Midway Home Entertainment.

August: HyperWare released the Midway Smash Pack 1 add-on for (coin-operated) HyperWare UltraCade units (UltraCade originally launched 3/29/2000 by Quantum3D) or HyperWare UltraCade Universal Conversion Kit units, featuring Asteroids, Defender, Defender II, Joust, KLAX (title by Midway Games West), Robotron: 2084, Tapper, Toobin' (title by Midway Games West)  (source; source)

September 18: Midway Games announced several syndication agreements whereby it would license classic videogames for play on a variety of emerging gaming mediums, including websites, handheld personal digital assistants (PDAs), cell phones and interactive television. Companies signed into licensing agreements with Midway included iWon, Heavy, RuneCraft, Index, Pocket Express, Terra Mobile-iobox

October 1: Happ Controls acquired assets of Midway Amusement Games' Midway and Atari Games coin-operated videogame parts and service business, and assumed warranty repair operations and all warranty obligations.  See http://www.happcontrols.com/midway/midway.htm

November 15?: Midway Home Entertainment released Midway's Greatest Arcade Hits 2 for Dreamcast, featuring: Gauntlet, Paperboy, 720°, Spy Hunter, Moon Patrol, Rampage

2002
January 30:
Midway Games announced that Mark Beaumont had been promoted from his position at the helm of Midway Games West to the position of Senior Vice President - Publishing for Midway Games.

March 5: Midway Home Entertainment released Gauntlet Dark Legacy by Midway Games West, converted by Big Ape Productions, for GameCube.

April 23: Midway Home Entertainment released Gauntlet Dark Legacy by Midway Games West, converted by Big Ape Productions, for Xbox.

May 22: At E3 in Los Angeles, Midway Games announced Dr. Muto by Midway Games West for PS2, Xbox, and GameCube, Nitrocity developed by Midway Games West (never shipped), and Gladiator: The Crimson Reign developed by Midway Games West (never shipped) for PS2, Xbox, and GameCube.

Month?: Midway Games West game producer/designer Mike Hally departed the company.

August 2: Midway Games announced that a re-make of Area 51 by Midway Games West for PS2, Xbox, and GameCube (never shipped for GameCube), was in development in collaboration with Stan Winston Studio.

October/November: Team Play released the coin-operated Retrocade Centipede/Millipede/Missile Command/Let's Go Bowling (25" upright, 19" Cabaret, or Kit), developed by Cosmodog; Centipede/Millipede/Missile Command titles by Infogrames Interactive, Inc., used under license from Midway Games West, Inc. (new game Let's Go Bowling developed by Cosmodog)

November 11: Midway Home Entertainment released Dr. Muto by Midway Games West for PS2 and for Xbox.

November 25: Midway Home Entertainment released Gauntlet Dark Legacy by Midway Games West for Game Boy Advance.

December 17: Midway Home Entertainment released Dr. Muto by Midway Games West for GameCube.

2003
January: Midway Home Entertainment released Dr. Muto by Midway Games West for Game Boy Advance.

February 7: Product development at Midway Games West (including previously announced titles Nitrocity and Gladiator: The Crimson Reign) was halted, the remaining 30 employees at the unit (including President and COO Dan Van Elderen) would be let go, and the Midway Games West office at 675 Sycamore Dr., Milpitas CA would be closed.

Month?: Team Play released Retrocade Classic Edition: Centipede/Missile Command/Millipede/Let's Go Bowling (25" Upright, 19" Cabaret, or Kit), developed by Cosmodog, 1st three properties by Atari Interactive via Infogrames Interactive, used under license from Midway Games West. ("Bonus Game" Let's Go Bowling developed by Cosmodog)

May 7: Midway Games announced that David F. Zucker had been named CEO and president.  Zucker would succeed Neil D. Nicastro, Midway's chairman who also stepped down as COO.  Nicastro would continue as chairman of Midway's board of directors.  Zucker joined Midway from Playboy Enterprises, Inc., where he was president and COO.

July 3: Midway Games announced Midway Arcade Treasures, to ship in fall 2003.

July 11: Midway Games announced that the previously-announced re-make of Midway Games West's Area 51 for PS2 and Xbox was to ship in 2004.

September 9: Midway Games announced that Chris Vrenna would score the music for the re-make of Midway Games West's Area 51, to ship in 2004 for PS2 and Xbox.

November 18: Midway Home Entertainment announced the release of Midway Arcade Treasures (1), developed by Digital Eclipse, for PlayStation 2, featuring: Spy Hunter, Defender, Defender II, Gauntlet, Joust, Joust 2, Paperboy, Rampage, Robotron 2084, Smash TV, Bubbles, RoadBlasters, Blaster, Rampart, Sinistar, Super Sprint, Marble Madness, 720°, Toobin', KLAX, SPLAT!, Satan's Hollow, Vindicators, Root Beer Tapper

November 24: Midway Home Entertainment released Midway Arcade Treasures (1), developed by Digital Eclipse, for Xbox, featuring: Spy Hunter, Defender, Defender II, Gauntlet, Joust, Joust 2, Paperboy, Rampage, Robotron 2084, Smash TV, Bubbles, RoadBlasters, Blaster, Rampart, Sinistar, Super Sprint, Marble Madness, 720°, Toobin', KLAX, SPLAT!, Satan's Hollow, Vindicators, Root Beer Tapper

December 17: Midway Home Entertainment released Midway Arcade Treasures (1), developed by Digital Eclipse, for GameCube, featuring: Spy Hunter, Defender, Defender II, Gauntlet, Joust, Joust 2, Paperboy, Rampage, Robotron 2084, Smash TV, Bubbles, RoadBlasters, Blaster, Rampart, Sinistar, Super Sprint, Marble Madness, 720°, Toobin', KLAX, SPLAT!, Satan's Hollow, Vindicators, Root Beer Tapper

2004
February 16: JAKKS Pacific announced that the company had signed a worldwide licensing agreement with Midway to produce a version of JAKKS' TV Games based on classic Midway titles, including the Midway Games West titles: Paperboy, Marble Madness, Super Sprint. (Jakks Pacific Midway Mortal Kombat shipped only)

April 26: Midway Games announced Midway Arcade Treasures 2, to ship fall 2004 for PS2, Xbox, and GameCube.

June 4: Midway Games announced that Neil D. Nicastro would resign as Chairman of the Midway board immediately following the June 10 annual meeting of Midway stockholders.

June 14: Midway Games announced that Kenneth D. Cron was the new Chairman of the Board, replacing Neil D. Nicastro.  David F. Zucker remained president and CEO.

August 26: Midway Games announced that the re-make of Midway Games West's Area 51, to ship in 2005 for PS2 and Xbox, would include the voice talents of David Duchovny, Powers Boothe, and Marilyn Manson.

September: Encore Software released Midway Arcade Treasures (1) by Midway Home Entertainment, developed by Digital Eclipse, for PC, featuring: Spy Hunter, Defender, Defender II, Gauntlet, Joust, Joust 2, Paperboy, Rampage, Robotron 2084, Smash TV, Bubbles, RoadBlasters, Blaster, Rampart, Sinistar, Super Sprint, Marble Madness, 720°, Toobin', KLAX, SPLAT!, Satan's Hollow, Vindicators, Root Beer Tapper

October 11: Midway Home Entertainment released Midway Arcade Treasures 2 for GameCube, for PlayStation 2, and for Xbox, featuring: Mortal Kombat II, Mortal Kombat 3, Gauntlet II, Spy Hunter II, Xybots, NARC, APB, Cyberball 2072, Timber, Total Carnage, Pit-Fighter, Wizard of Wor, Xenophobe, Primal Rage, Arch Rivals, Rampage World Tour, Kozmik Krooz'r, Championship Sprint, Hard Drivin', Wacko

2005
February 16:
Midway Games announced Midway Arcade Treasures 3, to ship fall 2005, for PS2, Xbox, and GameCube.

February 16: Midway Games announced that the re-make of Midway Games West's Area 51, developed by Midway Studios Austin, would ship for PC in addition to the previously-announced PS2 and Xbox versions, all in April 2005.

February 17: Midway Games announced Gauntlet: Seven Sorrows, under development by Midway Games San Diego, title by Midway Games West, for PS2, Xbox, and PC, to ship winter 2006.

April 25: Midway Home Entertainment released Area 51 by Midway Studios - Austin, title by Midway Games West, for PS2 and for Xbox.

May 18-20: At E3 in Los Angeles, Midway Games featured: Gauntlet: Seven Sorrows (PS2, Xbox; Winter 2005), Midway Arcade Treasures 3 (PS2, Xbox, GC; Fall 2005), Midway Arcade Treasures (PSP; would ship as: Midway Arcade Treasures: Extended Play; Winter 2005)

May 23: Midway Home Entertainment released Area 51 by Midway Studios - Austin, title by Midway Games West, for PC.

August 16?: DSI Games released Marble Madness / Klax, developed by Frame Studios Interactive, titles by Midway Games West, for Game Boy Advance.

August 19: Mark Beaumont departed from his primary position as senior vice president--entertainment at Midway Games, also departing from his position as senior vice president--business development for Midway Games West.

August 21?: DSI Games released Paperboy / Rampage, titles by Midway Games West, for Game Boy Advance.

September 26: Midway Home Entertainment announced the release of Midway Arcade Treasures 3 for PlayStation 2 and for Xbox, featuring: Badlands, Off Road Thunder, Race Drivin', San Francisco Rush The Rock: Alcatraz Edition, S.T.U.N. Runner, Super Off Road, Hydro Thunder, San Francisco Rush 2049

October 24: Midway Home Entertainment released Midway Arcade Treasures 3 for GameCube, featuring: Badlands, Off Road Thunder, Race Drivin', San Francisco Rush The Rock: Alcatraz Edition, S.T.U.N. Runner, Super Off Road, Hydro Thunder, San Francisco Rush 2049

November 3?: DSI Games released Gauntlet / Rampart, developed by EC Interactive Games, titles by Midway Games West, for Game Boy Advance.

November 22: Midway Games released Gauntlet, developed by Digital Eclipse, title by Midway Games West, on Xbox Live Arcade for the Xbox 360 (as part of the platform launch).

December 12: Midway Home Entertainment announced the release of Midway Arcade Treasures: Extended Play for PSP, featuring: 720°, Arch Rivals, Championship Sprint, Cyberball 2072, Defender, Gauntlet, Joust, KLAX, Mortal Kombat, Marble Madness, Mortal Kombat II, Mortal Kombat 3, Paperboy, Rampage, Rampart, Sinistar, Spy Hunter, Toobin', Wizard of Wor, Xenophobe, Xybots

December 12: Midway Home Entertainment released Gauntlet: Seven Sorrows, title by Midway Games West, for PS2 and for Xbox.

2006
February 15:
Midway Home Entertainment released of Midway Arcade Treasures: Deluxe Edition, developed by Digital Eclipse, for PC, featuring: Mortal Kombat, Mortal Kombat II, Mortal Kombat 3, Gauntlet II, Spy Hunter II, Xybots, NARC, APB, Cyberball 2072, Timber, Total Carnage, Pit-Fighter, Wizard of Wor, Xenophobe, Primal Rage, Arch Rivals, Rampage World Tour, Kozmik Krooz'r, Championship Sprint, Hard Drivin', Wacko, Badlands, Hydro Thunder, Off Road Thunder, Race Drivin', San Francisco Rush the Rock: Alcatraz Edition, San Francisco Rush 2049, S.T.U.N. Runner, and Super Off Road

May 9: At the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) in Los Angeles, Microsoft announced that Midway Games would bring a suite of classic arcade titles to Xbox Live Arcade, including the Midway Games West title Paperboy.

November 7: Midway Games West business address: 10110 Mesa Rim Rd., San Diego CA.  Midway Games West officers: CEO David F. Zucker, secretary Deborah K. Fulton, CFO Thomas E. Powell. (CA Statement of Information)

2007
January 29:
Midway Games announced BlackSite: Area 51 by Midway Games West, under development by Midway Studios-Austin, for PS3, Xbox 360, and for PC, to ship summer 2007.

February 14: Midway Games released Paperboy, developed by Digital Eclipse, title by Midway Games West, on Xbox Live Arcade for the Xbox 360.

September 5: Midway Games released Cyberball 2072, developed by Digital Eclipse, title by Midway Games West, on Xbox Live Arcade for the Xbox 360.

November 12: Midway Home Entertainment released BlackSite: Area 51 by Midway Games West for Xbox 360 and for PC.

December: Midway Home Entertainment released BlackSite: Area 51 by Midway Games West for PS3.

December 21: Midway Games announced that Shari E. Redstone was the new company chairman, replacing the departed Kenneth D. Cron.  (David F. Zucker remained president and CEO.)

2008
February 14: Midway Games West address: 10636 Scripps Summit Court Suite 100, San Diego CA.  Midway Games West officers: CEO David F. Zucker, secretary Deborah K. Fulton, CFO Ryan G. O'desky. (CA Statement of Information)

March 20: Midway Games named Matthew V. Booty Interim Chief Executive Officer and President, in place of the departing David F. Zucker.

June 2: Midway Games released Gauntlet: Seven Sorrows, title by Midway Games West, on Xbox Live Arcade for the Xbox 360.

July 11: Midway Games announced the launch of the online gaming site www.midwayarcade.com.  The initial online game lineup included: APB, Arch Rivals, Cyberball, Defender, Gauntlet 2, Rampage, Rootbeer Tapper, Spy Hunter, Joust, Primal Rage, Super Offroad, Total Carnage, Wizard of Wor, Robotron: 2084

October 30: Midway Games announced that Matthew V. Booty had been appointed as President and CEO.  Mr. Booty had served as interim president and CEO of Midway Games since March, 2008.

November 7: Midway Games announced that Peter C. Brown was the new Chairman, replacing the departing Shari E. Redstone.

December 1: National Amusements (headed by investor Sumner Redstone) sold its 87% stake in Midway Games to investor Mark Thomas for $100,000 and $70 million in receivables.

2009
January 29:
Midway Games announced its president and CEO Matthew V. Booty was now also the new Chairman, replacing the departed Peter C. Brown.

February 12: Midway Games announced that the company and its U.S. subsidiaries filed voluntary petitions in U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

May 20: Midway Games agreed to sell most of its U.S. assets, including its Mortal Kombat video game franchise and its development studios in Seattle and Chicago, to Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc., a division of Time Warner Inc., for $33 million, subject to adjustment.

July 1: A Delaware bankruptcy judge approved the $33 million sale of most of the assets of Midway Games to Warner Bros. Entertainment.

July 10: Pursuant to the Asset Purchase Agreement dated May 20, 2009, Midway Games completed their sale of substantially all of their assets to Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc., a subsidiary of Time Warner Inc. The aggregate gross purchase price was approximately US$49 million including the assumption of certain liabilities.  The transaction included the entire library of Midway Games West properties.

2010
February: Midway Games games, including the Midway Games West titles Gauntlet, Cyberball 2072, and Paperboy, were removed from the Xbox Live Marketplace "due to evolving rights and permissions."

2012
Fabruary 22:
Warner Bros. Entertainment released Midway Arcade for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, featuring Joust, Defender, Rampage, Spy Hunter, Arch Rivals, Root Beer Tapper, air hockey, basketball quick-shot games, billiards, and Roll Ball (a Skee Ball clone), along with two in-app purchases: Fantasy Game Pack included Gauntlet, Gauntlet II, and Wizard of Wor; Action Game Pack included NARC, Total Carnage, and APB.

November 13: Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment released Midway Arcade Origins, developed by Backbone Entertainment, titles by Warner Bros. Entertainment, for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, featuring: Joust, Defender, Rampage, Total Carnage, Gauntlet, 720°, APB, Arch Rivals, Bubbles, Championship Sprint, Tournament Cyberball 2072, Defender II, Gauntlet II, Joust 2, Marble Madness, Pit-Fighter, Rampart, Robotron 2084, Root Beer Tapper, Satan's Hollow, Sinistar, Smash TV, Spy Hunter, Spy Hunter II, Super Off Road, Super Sprint, Toobin', Vindicators Part II, Wizard of Wor, Xenophobe, Xybots


Additional Tengen releases, introduction/release dates unverified:

for NES:

for Game Gear (Europe):

for Game Gear:

for Genesis

for Genesis (USA distribution):

for Mega Drive (Europe)

for Sega Master System (Europe)

Hardware accessories distributed by Tengen for home game systems:


Links


Last updated: 2017.03.15

other updates: 2012.08.22 identify System II systems & redemption games, thanks Vernon Brooks